About us

DevNet connects academics, students and development practitioners to facilitate the exchange of ideas, information and research.

The Aotearoa New Zealand International Development Studies Network links people and organisations involved and interested in the broad field of international development in Aotearoa New Zealand and the wider world…

CONFERENCES

DevNet’s conferences have been held biennially since 1998. Aotearoa New Zealand’s largest, regular conference on international development, provides a great opportunity for people from Aotearoa, the Pacific and others to learn from each other and from international experts. Keynote speakers have…

RESOURCES

eSocSci is an interactive knowledge space for communicating social science research and bringing together people who have common research interests in Aotearoa New Zealand. It includes an eLibrary of working papers on topic related to a variety of topics including migration, health, education…

PROF. ANTHONY BEBBINGTON

Director of the Graduate School of Geography, Clark University, MA, USA

MICHAEL EDWARDS

Director of the Governance and Civil Society Unit at the Ford Foundation

DEVNET NEWS



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FACEBOOK POSTS

2 weeks ago

DevNet

Check out what Jojo Woodham from Victoria University of Wellington got up to thanks to her Field Research Award from New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade! Her topic is 'From Dumpsite to Landfill: navigating social inclusion within solid waste management in Dili, Timor-Leste'

"Flying into Dili, Timor-Leste’s capital, you might see smoke rising from the west. This is Tibar dumpsite, Timor-Leste’s official waste disposal site. I took this picture on my first site-visit, but the smoke is a daily occurrence. The people in the photo are burning rubbish to expose scrap-metal, which is then stockpiled and sold to a dealer. In a way, these waste-workers provide a public service; reducing the volume of waste and facilitating recycling. Dumpsites like Tibar are not uncommon in developing countries, yet they pose severe environmental and public health risks - this was very much evident from my site-visits to Tibar. You can feel the smoke in your eyes.
The Timorese government is currently looking to upgrade Tibar to a controlled landfill. Elsewhere, waste-workers are excluded from this process, governments typically prohibit waste-workers’ access to their livelihoods. Guided by environmental justice, my research looks at balancing social inclusion with improved environmental outcomes in Dili’s dumpsite-to-landfill transition.
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Check out what Jojo Woodham from Victoria University of Wellington got up to thanks to her Field Research Award from New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade! Her topic is From Dumpsite to Landfill: navigating social inclusion within solid waste management in Dili, Timor-Leste

Flying into Dili, Timor-Leste’s capital, you might see smoke rising from the west. This is Tibar dumpsite, Timor-Leste’s official waste disposal site. I took this picture on my first site-visit, but the smoke is a daily occurrence. The people in the photo are burning rubbish to expose scrap-metal, which is then stockpiled and sold to a dealer. In a way, these waste-workers provide a public service; reducing the volume of waste and facilitating recycling. Dumpsites like Tibar are not uncommon in developing countries, yet they pose severe environmental and public health risks - this was very much evident from my site-visits to Tibar. You can feel the smoke in your eyes.
The Timorese government is currently looking to upgrade Tibar to a controlled landfill. Elsewhere, waste-workers are excluded from this process, governments typically prohibit waste-workers’ access to their livelihoods. Guided by environmental justice, my research looks at balancing social inclusion with improved environmental outcomes in Dili’s dumpsite-to-landfill transition.

3 weeks ago

DevNet

Thanks to a Field Research Award from New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Cristine Werle of Institute of Development Studies at Massey was able to do fascinating fieldwork on the Cuban scheme to train medical doctors - "The gift of health: Cuban medical cooperation in Kiribati"

Cristine (centre of photo, long hair) writes: "I recently spent a month in Tarawa talking to the community and the incredibly resilient Cuban-trained doctors featured in the picture. My main interest was to investigate how the public health driven medicine practised by Cuba is translated by these doctors in the Pacific context, where a lot of disease is preventable. With insufficient workers and high demand for specialised care, Kiribati’s health system is largely curative, meaning that Cuban-trained doctors struggle to make the transition and that their knowledge about prevention is under-explored". Massey University
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Thanks to a Field Research Award from New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Cristine Werle of Institute of Development Studies at Massey was able to do fascinating fieldwork on the Cuban scheme to train medical doctors - The gift of health: Cuban medical cooperation in Kiribati

Cristine (centre of photo, long hair) writes: I recently spent a month in Tarawa talking to the community and the incredibly resilient Cuban-trained doctors featured in the picture. My main interest was to investigate how the public health driven medicine practised by Cuba is translated by these doctors in the Pacific context, where a lot of disease is preventable. With insufficient workers and high demand for specialised care, Kiribati’s health system is largely curative, meaning that Cuban-trained doctors struggle to make the transition and that their knowledge about prevention is under-explored. Massey University

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Weldone!

Bravooo

3 weeks ago

DevNet

Continuing our series celebrating New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade Field Research Award recipients, here is what Ruby McGruddy, Master of International Development student Massey University Institute of Development Studies at Massey found when examining
- Natural disasters, mental health and service responses: A case study of the 2009 Samoan tsunami.

“Fieldwork in Samoa really helped me to better understand the local context, both culturally and geographically. Seeing the landscape of Aleipata, the region worst affected by the 2009 tsunami, was eye opening. Nothing you read can compare to standing on the coast with the hills behind you and imagining the sheer terror that must have overcome the people of this region when the tsunami hit. However, faith and strong familial and communal ties provide an invaluable source of resilience. Coming together, sharing stories and finding humour in even the worst situations are just some of the ways that the Samoan people supported psycho-social wellbeing in the wake of a disaster”.
... See MoreSee Less

Continuing our series celebrating New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade Field Research Award recipients, here is what Ruby McGruddy, Master of International Development student Massey University Institute of Development Studies at Massey found when examining
- Natural disasters, mental health and service responses: A case study of the 2009 Samoan tsunami.

“Fieldwork in Samoa really helped me to better understand the local context, both culturally and geographically. Seeing the landscape of Aleipata, the region worst affected by the 2009 tsunami, was eye opening. Nothing you read can compare to standing on the coast with the hills behind you and imagining the sheer terror that must have overcome the people of this region when the tsunami hit. However, faith and strong familial and communal ties provide an invaluable source of resilience. Coming together, sharing stories and finding humour in even the worst situations are just some of the ways that the Samoan people supported psycho-social wellbeing in the wake of a disaster”.

TWITTER FEEDS

Great news! @MFATgovtNZ have now advertised Field Research Awards for 2020. Are you a Master's or PhD student in a NZ university planning to do development fieldwork in 2020? Check out if you're eligible for this funding!
Applications are due 9 December.
https://t.co/vhXUfqGyBS.

More great research from a recipient of a NZ Ministry of Foreign Affairs & Trade Field Research Award! Akisi Nailaba Ravono- PhD Candidate Pasifika@Massey Patients & nurses’ vision for the care of people living with diabetes & associated conditions in Fiji
https://t.co/9fiQbegeLF

Another great example of research enabled by a NZ Ministry of Foreign Affairs a& Trade Field Research Award- Bridget Payne- Master of Development Studies, Victoria University. How do communities exercise agency in forest carbon? The Loru project in Vanuatu https://t.co/jfMj0cx9x1

Continuing our series on NZ Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade Field Research Award recipient, we profile the research of Michelle Greene
PhD Candidate, @IDS_Massey
Physical Education (PE) as a Pathway for Gender Empowerment: Rarotonga, Cook Islands... https://t.co/LISudo7z7n

Another student who has benefited hugely from a NZ Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade Field Research Award is Ivor Kaisami, who is doing his MIntDev @IDS_Massey Pasifika@Massey on Traditional Climate-Smart Agriculture in Tokelau https://t.co/d6urR6aZYO