About us

DevNet connects academics, students and development practitioners to facilitate the exchange of ideas, information and research.

The Aotearoa New Zealand International Development Studies Network links people and organisations involved and interested in the broad field of international development in Aotearoa New Zealand and the wider world…

CONFERENCES

DevNet’s conferences have been held biennially since 1998. Aotearoa New Zealand’s largest, regular conference on international development, provides a great opportunity for people from Aotearoa, the Pacific and others to learn from each other and from international experts. Keynote speakers have…

RESOURCES

eSocSci is an interactive knowledge space for communicating social science research and bringing together people who have common research interests in Aotearoa New Zealand. It includes an eLibrary of working papers on topic related to a variety of topics including migration, health, education…

PROF. ANTHONY BEBBINGTON

Director of the Graduate School of Geography, Clark University, MA, USA

MICHAEL EDWARDS

Director of the Governance and Civil Society Unit at the Ford Foundation


DEVNET NEWS



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2 days ago
DevNet

Please kindly be reminded of the following key dates:

Session submission deadline: 30 July 2024
Abstract submission deadline: 30 August 2024

If you are an academic, development practitioner, or policymaker working at an academic or research institution, NGO, development consultancy, or government agency, we want to hear from you. Ideas for non-academic sessions, such as workshops on practical skills, or forums to seek feedback on new policy directions, are also welcomed!

DevNet offers a limited number of Conference Grants to support students currently studying at New Zealand tertiary institutions, as well as students, academics, and development practitioners from the Pacific, to participate in the DevNet 2024 Conference. Stay tuned for further information.
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Please kindly be reminded of the following key dates:
Session submission deadline: 30 July 2024
Abstract submission deadline: 30 August 2024
If you are an academic, development practitioner, or policymaker working at an academic or research institution, NGO, development consultancy, or government agency, we want to hear from you. Ideas for non-academic sessions, such as workshops on practical skills, or forums to seek feedback on new policy directions, are also welcomed! 
DevNet offers a limited number of Conference Grants to support students currently studying at New Zealand tertiary institutions, as well as students, academics, and development practitioners from the Pacific, to participate in the DevNet 2024 Conference. Stay tuned for further information.
4 weeks ago
DevNet

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2 months ago
DevNet

This week, we would like to introduce you to Shaya Malini from the University of the South Pacific. Shaya received the DevNet Pacific Development Research Award in 2023 for her Master's research on "Perceptions of Rural Indo-Fijian Women on the Effectiveness and Implications of the No Drop Policy in Fiji." Shaya shared her story with us:

“The Pacific Islands have some of the highest rates of domestic violence in the world, Fiji alone having a prevalence rate of 64% without overlooking the fact that most cases go unreported. In 1995, women’s movements in Fiji, particularly the Fiji Women’s Crisis Centre, advocated for stronger responses and support for battling domestic violence, which led to the Introduction of the No-drop Policy. The No-drop policy allows prosecutors to prosecute perpetrators of domestic violence cases regardless of victim participation. However, despite the No-drop policy in place, the high prevalence of domestic violence continues to raise questions about the efficacy of the policy as this policy itself is debated by many feminists and academics. My research, which is supported by the University of South Pacific and DevNet focuses on exploring the perceptions of rural women and stakeholders involved in the implementation process of the No-drop policy.

I chose rural women because there is very little research done on this policy globally and many studies have shown that rural women are more prone to domestic violence. I wanted a holistic view of the challenges women experienced when engaging with the No-drop policy and factors that restrained them from using such policies. My findings stated that factors such as cultural attitudes (mindset, lack of privacy and anonymity), family background and socio-economic factors (age, number of children and family support), patriarchy, isolation and geographic location limit women’s decision to report and engage with such policies.

I am very grateful for the grant provided by DevNet to assist me in my fieldwork which allowed me to interact with more participants and stay longer in Vanua Levu tapping into remote islands such as Taveuni which allowed me to gather promising data for this research. The information gathered in my research is a starting point for more studies in rural areas in relation to domestic violence policies and also will help me write other articles and meet with other NGOs that can use this data to assist more women in rural areas in terms of accessing justice systems.”

Please go to our website to learn more about Shaya's research findings and her research brief: devnet.org.nz/shaya-malini-university-of-the-south-pacific/
... See MoreSee Less

This week, we would like to introduce you to Shaya Malini from the University of the South Pacific. Shaya received the DevNet Pacific Development Research Award in 2023 for her Masters research on Perceptions of Rural Indo-Fijian Women on the Effectiveness and Implications of the No Drop Policy in Fiji. Shaya shared her story with us:
“The Pacific Islands have some of the highest rates of domestic violence in the world, Fiji alone having a prevalence rate of 64% without overlooking the fact that most cases go unreported. In 1995, women’s movements in Fiji, particularly the Fiji Women’s Crisis Centre, advocated for stronger responses and support for battling domestic violence, which led to the Introduction of the No-drop Policy. The No-drop policy allows prosecutors to prosecute perpetrators of domestic violence cases regardless of victim participation. However, despite the No-drop policy in place, the high prevalence of domestic violence continues to raise questions about the efficacy of the policy as this policy itself is debated by many feminists and academics. My research, which is supported by the University of South Pacific and DevNet focuses on exploring the perceptions of rural women and stakeholders involved in the implementation process of the No-drop policy.
I chose rural women because there is very little research done on this policy globally and many studies have shown that rural women are more prone to domestic violence. I wanted a holistic view of the challenges women experienced when engaging with the No-drop policy and factors that restrained them from using such policies. My findings stated that factors such as cultural attitudes (mindset, lack of privacy and anonymity), family background and socio-economic factors (age, number of children and family support), patriarchy, isolation and geographic location limit women’s decision to report and engage with such policies.
I am very grateful for the grant provided by DevNet to assist me in my fieldwork which allowed me to interact with more participants and stay longer in Vanua Levu tapping into remote islands such as Taveuni which allowed me to gather promising data for this research. The information gathered in my research is a starting point for more studies in rural areas in relation to domestic violence policies and also will help me write other articles and meet with other NGOs that can use this data to assist more women in rural areas in terms of accessing justice systems.”
Please go to our website to learn more about Shayas research findings and her research brief: https://devnet.org.nz/shaya-malini-university-of-the-south-pacific/

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